There’s Still Time! Go Here For Last Minute Deals That Will Ship Fast – Deal Alert

Procrastination has once again turned into desperation. “Maybe I could whittle a pan flute from those broken chair legs in the basement”, you’re thinking. Snap out of it! Stay calm and remind yourself that with just a few minutes on Amazon right now you can still snag great gifts for anyone left on your list, and have them at your doorstep with plenty of time to gift wrap. Amazon’s “last minute deals” page right here features great deals in almost any department, guaranteed by Amazon to arrive by Christmas. You need Amazon Prime to take advantage of free 2-day shipping, so if you don’t have a membership, take a minute to sign up for a free 30 day trial and feel the weight lift from your shoulders. But do it soon — once the 2-day window closes, things will get ugly. Breathe deeply and go get the job done: See Amazon’s Last Minute Deals.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

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13 ways the cloud has changed (since last you looked)

The definition of cloud computing has always been, well, a bit cloudy. The basic idea has been straightforward: If it’s not calculated or stored in a rack in your own office on metal you can touch, it’s in the cloud. If it’s someone else’s machine in someone else’s colo, it’s in the cloud.

The details, though, aren’t as crisp. What you get and when you get it has evolved over the years, shifting as the market begins to understand what people want and what they really need. In the beginning, you got a machine and a root password — that’s about it. Everything else was up to you. Now the tools and techniques for building out infrastructure are getting better. The stock machines, after all, are commodities, so the companies are competing by adding bells and whistles that make your life easier.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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NetSuite CEO: The cloud is the last computing architecture

As CEO of NetSuite, Zach Nelson knows a thing or two about cloud computing. After all, his company was born in the cloud way back in 1998 — before it became fashionable — and it’s been all-cloud ever since, offering ERP and other business software as a service by subscription.

“We were effectively the first cloud app,” Nelson said in a recent interview. “The idea was to build a system to run a business, and oh by the way, deliver it over the Internet.”

Originally, the company was known as NetLedger. Today, it has plenty of company in the cloud.

Not only have a raft of other cloud-first startups arrived, but traditional vendors of on-premises business software also have been racing to the cloud with new and retooled offerings for enterprise resource planning, e-commerce, customer relationship management and more.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

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